Bodybuilding Supplements Can Allow You to Retain Your Physique

Bodybuilding Supplements Can Allow You to Retain Your Physique

However, as a novelty of this investigation, the data indicate that the most prevalent group of substances were ones that had little scientific evidence (Fig. 1). This effect was produced by the high number of supplements available in the market that contain minimal evidence of its effectiveness. Taking the best care of that little one is the goal. In the sample of athletes that took at least one supplement, four out of five athletes did not know platforms to check the safety/quality of supplements. This outcome is likely the result of current supplementation practices that imply a poor knowledge about the effect and efficacy of supplements along with reliance on sources with low credibility, at least in this sample of high-performance athletes.

This result highlights the importance of elite athletes’ reliance on sports nutritionists and scientists to design their supplementation plans. Until the mid-1960s, physicians lumped together most forms of arthritis that affected four or more joints as rheumatoid arthritis. Anecdotal reports and scientific studies alike find that guys who take creatine gain a good 10 pounds or more of body weight and increase strength dramatically. You could eat good and go for baked chicken, potatoes or fish. Furthermore, only a relatively small percentage of the athletes not taking dietary supplements reported fearing contamination of the supplement. A more sua non mama informed athlete population will likely reduce the strong effect of purchasing multiple types of supplements that have been driven by dietary supplement manufacturers.

This information points towards the necessity of increasing the knowledge of the benefits and risks of supplementation in the elite athlete population. This information would allow FDA to prioritize its resources, enabling it to take more effective, risk-based enforcement actions. Although the median of supplement consumption per athlete was three supplements per year, a high proportion of athletes consumed more than eight different supplements and at different times of the season. Additionally, although it was made clear that the questionnaire was anonymous, it is possible that due to personal bias, some athletes may have intentionally avoided reporting some information regarding supplement consumption. To avoid wrongfully identifying supplements, open space was provided in the questionnaire to fully describe the supplement (name, brand, type, and other extra information that they could recall) to improve the identification of each supplement.